Install-Module -Name DockerMsftProvider -Repository PSGallery -Force Use OneGet to install the latest version of Docker. Install-Package -Name docker -ProviderName DockerMsftProvider When the installation is complete, reboot the computer. Restart-Computer -Force Install a specific version of Docker. I tried to install Docker on activated windows server 2016 standard. I executed “Install-Module -Name DockerMsftProvider -Repository PSGallery -Force” but failed. It suggested that can not find PSGallery. I executed 'Get-PSRepository'. The error: WARNING: Unable to find module repositories.

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This tutorial describes how to:

Prerequisites

Windows Server

To run containers on Windows Server, you need a physical server or virtual machine running Windows Server (Semi-Annual Channel), Windows Server 2019, or Windows Server 2016.

For testing, you can download a copy of Windows Server 2019 Evaluation or a Windows Server Insider Preview.

Windows 10

To run containers on Windows 10, you need the following:

  • One physical computer system running Windows 10 Professional or Enterprise with Anniversary Update (version 1607) or later.
  • Hyper-V should be enabled.

Note

Starting with the Windows 10 October Update 2018, we no longer disallow users from running a Windows container in process-isolation mode on Windows 10 Enterprise or Professional for dev/test purposes. See the FAQ to learn more.

Windows Server Containers use Hyper-V isolation by default on Windows 10 in order to provide developers with the same kernel version and configuration that will be used in production. Learn more about Hyper-V isolation in the Concepts area of our docs.

Install Docker

The first step is to install Docker, which is required for working with Windows containers. Docker provides a standard runtime environment for containers, with a common API and command-line interface (CLI).

For more configuration details, see Docker Engine on Windows.

To install Docker on Windows Server, you can use a OneGet provider PowerShell module published by Microsoft called the DockerMicrosoftProvider. This provider enables the containers feature in Windows and installs the Docker engine and client. Here's how:

  1. Open an elevated PowerShell session and install the Docker-Microsoft PackageManagement Provider from the PowerShell Gallery.

    If you're prompted to install the NuGet provider, type Y to install it as well.

  2. Use the PackageManagement PowerShell module to install the latest version of Docker.

    When PowerShell asks you whether to trust the package source 'DockerDefault', type A to continue the installation.

  3. After the installation completes, restart the computer.

If you want to update Docker later:

  • Check the installed version using:
  • Find the current version using:
  • When you're ready, upgrade using:
  • Then, followed with:

You can use Windows Admin Center to properly set up a Windows Server machine as a container host. To get started, ensure you have the latest Containers extension installed on your Windows Admin Center instance. For more information on how to install and configure extensions, check out the Windows Admin Center documentation. With the Containers extension installed, target the Windows Server machine you want to configure and select the Containers option:

Click the Install button. Windows Admin Center will start the configuration of Windows Server and Docker in the background. After the process is complete, you can refresh the page and see the other functionalities of the Containers extension.

You can install Docker on Windows 10 Professional and Enterprise editions by using the following steps.

  1. Download and install Docker Desktop, creating a free Docker account if you don't have one already. For more details, see the Docker documentation.

  2. During installation, set the default container type to Windows containers. To switch after installation completes, you can use either the Docker item in the Windows system tray (as shown below), or the following command in a PowerShell prompt:

Next steps

Now that your environment has been configured correctly, follow the link to learn how to run a container.

Windows Server 2019 is the next long-term support release of Windows Server, and it's available now! It comes with some very useful improvements to running Docker Windows containers - which Docker Captain Stefan Scherer has already summarized in his blog post What's new for Docker on Windows Server 2019.

UPDATE: the second edition of my book Docker on Windows is out now. It focuses entirely on Windows Server 2019

You need Windows Server to run 'pure' Docker containers, where the container process runs directly on the host OS. You can use the same Docker images, the same Dockerfiles and the same dockerBluestacks among us mac. commands on Windows 10, but there's an additional virtualization overhead, so it's good to use a Windows Server VM for test environments.

On Windows 10 Docker Desktop is the easiest way to get started

If you want to check out the newest version of Windows Server and get running Docker containers, here's what you need to do.

Get Windows Server 2019

You can download the ISO to install Windows Server 2019 now, from your Visual Studio subscription if you have one, or a 180-day evaluation version if you don't. VMs with Windows Server 2019 already deployed will be available on Azure shortly.

The installation procedure for 2019 is the same as previous Windows Server versions - boot a VM from the ISO and the setup starts. I prefer the core installation with no GUI:

I installed Server 2019 onto a Hyper-V VM running on my Windows 10 machine, with the VM disks stored on an external SSD drive. The setup finished in a few minutes, and it runs very quickly - even with just 4GB RAM allocated.

You can also upgrade from previous Windows Server versions to 2019 using the ISO.

Connect to the Server

When you RDP into a Windows Server Core machine you just see a command prompt. The first time you connect you'll need to set the password for the default Administrator account. Then I like to set PowerShell as the default command shell, so whenever you RDP you get into a PowerShell session:

Configure Windows Features

To run containers you need to enable the Containers feature, and for a non-production VM I also disable Windows Defender to stop it burning CPU cycles. You'll need to reboot after these steps:

Configure Windows Updates

You'll want to make sure you have the latest updates, but then I disable automatic updates so I only get future updates when I want them. There's no GUI in Windows Server Core, so run sconfig and then select:

  • option 5, to set Windows Updates to manual

  • option 7, to enable Remote Desktop Access to the server

  • option 6, to download and install all updates

Then you're ready to install Docker.

Install Docker on Window Server 2019

Windows Server licensing includes the licence cost for Docker Enterprise, so you can run the enterprise edition with production support for containers from Microsoft and Docker.

The latest Docker Enterprise engine is version 19.03 18.03, which you can explicitly install with PowerShell:

Docker

This sets up Docker as a Windows Service, which you need to start:

Pull the Windows Base Images

Any Docker containers you run on Windows Server 2019 will be based on Windows Server Core or Nano Server. You'll need both those images, and be aware that the base images are now hosted on Microsoft's container registry, MCR:

Dockermsftprovider Docker

These images are tiny compared to the Windows Server 2016 versions. Windows Server Core has shrunk from over 10GB to a 1.5GB download, and Nano Server has shrunk from over 1GB to a 90MB download!

[Optional] Pull the .NET Core Images

Dockermsftprovider No Match Was Found

The .NET Core team released versions of their SDK and runtime images as soon as Windows Server 2019 launched. You can pull those now and start running your .NET Core apps in 2019 (there are also .NET Framework SDK and ASP.NET images available - hopefully SQL Server will get some attention soon..)

Dockermsftprovider offline

The upstream Docker images are still listed on Docker Hub, so that's where you go for discovery - but they get served from Microsoft's own image registry, MCR.

Try it Out!

I've pushed an updated version of my .NET Core whoami image, so you can try out ASP.NET Core 3.0 running in Windows Server Core 2019 containers:

One of the enhancements for Docker in Windows Server 2019 is that loopback addresses now work, so you can visit this container using localhost on the server, and using the same published port from an external machine:

And in Swarm Mode..

I'll post a longer explanation of what you can do with Docker in Windows Server 2019 that you couldn't do in Windows Server 2016, but here's just one other thing: Windows Server 2019 now supports ingress networking for Docker swarm mode. That means you can run multiple containers on one server, all listening on the same port, and Docker will load-balance incoming requests between the containers.

I have lots more detail on this in my Pluralsight course Managing Load Balancing and Scale in Docker Swarm Mode Clusters

Dockermsftprovider

Switch your server to a single-node swarm:

Now deploy the whoami app as a swarm service, with multiple replicas and a published port:

Now when you browse to the VM from outside, Docker will load-balance requests across the five containers which are hosting the service:

There's More

Windows Server 2019 is an evolution to the container functionality you get with Docker. Windows Server 2016 is still perfectly fine for production, but 2019 brings Windows containers much closer to feature parity with Linux containers, and smooths over some things which are tricky in 2016.

And the next big thing is Windows support in Kubernetes, which is expected to GA before the end of the year :) went GA this year. Windows containers are now supported in mixed Linux-Windows Kubernetes clusters - find out more from my post Getting Started with Kubernetes on Windows.

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