Note: This tutorial uses version 18.05.0-ce of Docker. If you find any part of the tutorial incompatible with a future version, please raise an issue. There are no specific skills needed for this tutorial beyond a basic comfort with the command line and using a text editor. The preferred choice for millions of developers that are building containerized apps. Docker Desktop is an application for MacOS and Windows machines for the building and sharing of containerized applications. Access Docker Desktop and follow the guided onboarding to build your first containerized application in minutes. Traefik reverse proxy makes setng up reverse proxy for docker containers host system apps a breeze. It can even automate Let's Encrypt certificates. This Traefik tutorial presents some Traefik Docker Compose examples to take your home media server to the next level.

Estimated reading time: 14 minutes

Welcome to Docker Desktop! The Docker Desktop for Mac user manual provides information on how to configure and manage your Docker Desktop settings.

For information about Docker Desktop download, system requirements, and installation instructions, see Install Docker Desktop.

Preferences

The Docker Preferences menu allows you to configure your Docker settings such as installation, updates, version channels, Docker Hub login,and more.

Choose the Docker menu > Preferences from themenu bar and configure the runtime options described below.

General

On the General tab, you can configure when to start and update Docker:

  • Start Docker Desktop when you log in: Automatically starts Docker Desktop when you open your session.

  • Include VM in Time Machine backups: Select this option to back up the Docker Desktop virtual machine. This option is disabled by default.

  • Securely store Docker logins in macOS keychain: Docker Desktop stores your Docker login credentials in macOS keychain by default.

  • Send usage statistics: Docker Desktop sends diagnostics, crash reports, and usage data. This information helps Docker improve and troubleshoot the application. Clear the check box to opt out.

Resources

The Resources tab allows you to configure CPU, memory, disk, proxies, network, and other resources.

Advanced

On the Advanced tab, you can limit resources available to Docker.

Advanced settings are:

CPUs: By default, Docker Desktop is set to use half the number of processorsavailable on the host machine. To increase processing power, set this to ahigher number; to decrease, lower the number.

Memory: By default, Docker Desktop is set to use 2 GB runtime memory,allocated from the total available memory on your Mac. To increase the RAM, set this to a higher number. To decrease it, lower the number.

Swap: Configure swap file size as needed. The default is 1 GB.

Disk image size: Specify the size of the disk image.

Disk image location: Specify the location of the Linux volume where containers and images are stored.

You can also move the disk image to a different location. If you attempt to move a disk image to a location that already has one, you get a prompt asking if you want to use the existing image or replace it.

File sharing

Use File sharing to allow local directories on the Mac to be shared with Linux containers.This is especially useful forediting source code in an IDE on the host while running and testing the code in a container.By default the /Users, /Volume, /private, /tmp and /var/folders directory are shared. If your project is outside this directory then it must be addedto the list. Otherwise you may get Mounts denied or cannot start service errors at runtime.

File share settings are:

  • Add a Directory: Click + and navigate to the directory you want to add.

  • Apply & Restart makes the directory available to containers using Docker’sbind mount (-v) feature.

Tips on shared folders, permissions, and volume mounts

  • Share only the directories that you need with the container. File sharing introduces overhead as any changes to the files on the host need to be notified to the Linux VM. Sharing too many files can lead to high CPU load and slow filesystem performance.

  • Shared folders are designed to allow application code to be edited on the host while being executed in containers. For non-code items such as cache directories or databases, the performance will be much better if they are stored in the Linux VM, using a data volume (named volume) or data container.

  • If you share the whole of your home directory into a container, MacOS may prompt you to give Docker access to personal areas of your home directory such as your Reminders or Downloads.

  • By default, Mac file systems are case-insensitive while Linux is case-sensitive. On Linux, it is possible to create 2 separate files: test and Test, while on Mac these filenames would actually refer to the same underlying file. This can lead to problems where an app works correctly on a Mac (where the file contents are shared) but fails when run in Linux in production (where the file contents are distinct). To avoid this, Docker Desktop insists that all shared files are accessed as their original case. Therefore, if a file is created called test, it must be opened as test. Attempts to open Test will fail with the error No such file or directory. Similarly, once a file called test is created, attempts to create a second file called Test will fail. For more information, see Volume mounting requires file sharing for any project directories outside of /Users.)

Proxies

Docker Desktop detects HTTP/HTTPS Proxy Settings from macOS and automaticallypropagates these to Docker. For example, if you set yourproxy settings to http://proxy.example.com, Docker uses this proxy whenpulling containers.

Your proxy settings, however, will not be propagated into the containers you start.If you wish to set the proxy settings for your containers, you need to defineenvironment variables for them, just like you would do on Linux, for example:

For more information on setting environment variables for running containers,see Set environment variables.

Network

You can configure Docker Desktop networking to work on a virtual private network (VPN). Specify a network address translation (NAT) prefix and subnet mask to enable Internet connectivity.

Docker Engine

The Docker Engine page allows you to configure the Docker daemon to determine how your containers run.

Type a JSON configuration file in the box to configure the daemon settings. For a full list of options, see the Docker Enginedockerd commandline reference.

Click Apply & Restart to save your settings and restart Docker Desktop.

Command Line

On the Command Line page, you can specify whether or not to enable experimental features.

Experimental features provide early access to future product functionality.These features are intended for testing and feedback only as they may changebetween releases without warning or can be removed entirely from a futurerelease. Experimental features must not be used in production environments.Docker does not offer support for experimental features.

For a list of current experimental features in the Docker CLI, see Docker CLI Experimental features.

You can toggle the experimental features on and off in Docker Desktop. If you toggle the experimental features off, Docker Desktop uses the current generally available release of Docker Engine.

You can see whether you are running experimental mode at the command line. IfExperimental is true, then Docker is running in experimental mode, as shownhere. (If false, Experimental mode is off.)

Kubernetes

Docker

Docker Desktop includes a standalone Kubernetes server that runs on your Mac, sothat you can test deploying your Docker workloads on Kubernetes. To enable Kubernetes support and install a standalone instance of Kubernetes running as a Docker container, select Enable Kubernetes.

For more information about using the Kubernetes integration with Docker Desktop, see Deploy on Kubernetes.

Reset

Reset and Restart options

On Docker Desktop Mac, the Restart Docker Desktop, Reset to factory defaults, and other reset options are available from the Troubleshoot menu.

For information about the reset options, see Logs and Troubleshooting.

Dashboard

The Docker Desktop Dashboard enables you to interact with containers and applications and manage the lifecycle of your applications directly from your machine. The Dashboard UI shows all running, stopped, and started containers with their state. It provides an intuitive interface to perform common actions to inspect and manage containers and existing Docker Compose applications. For more information, see Docker Desktop Dashboard.

Add TLS certificates

You can add trusted Certificate Authorities (CAs) (used to verify registryserver certificates) and client certificates (used to authenticate toregistries) to your Docker daemon.

Docker Kubernetes Tutorial Mac

Add custom CA certificates (server side)

All trusted CAs (root or intermediate) are supported. Docker Desktop creates acertificate bundle of all user-trusted CAs based on the Mac Keychain, andappends it to Moby trusted certificates. So if an enterprise SSL certificate istrusted by the user on the host, it is trusted by Docker Desktop.

To manually add a custom, self-signed certificate, start by adding thecertificate to the macOS keychain, which is picked up by Docker Desktop. Here isan example:

Apple tv app download macbook. Or, if you prefer to add the certificate to your own local keychain only (ratherthan for all users), run this command instead:

See also, Directory structures forcertificates.

Note: You need to restart Docker Desktop after making any changes to thekeychain or to the ~/.docker/certs.d directory in order for the changes totake effect.

For a complete explanation of how to do this, see the blog post AddingSelf-signed Registry Certs to Docker & Docker Desktop forMac.

Add client certificates

You can put your client certificates in~/.docker/certs.d/<MyRegistry>:<Port>/client.cert and~/.docker/certs.d/<MyRegistry>:<Port>/client.key.

When the Docker Desktop application starts, it copies the ~/.docker/certs.dfolder on your Mac to the /etc/docker/certs.d directory on Moby (the DockerDesktop xhyve virtual machine).

  • You need to restart Docker Desktop after making any changes to the keychainor to the ~/.docker/certs.d directory in order for the changes to takeeffect.

  • The registry cannot be listed as an insecure registry (see DockerEngine. Docker Desktop ignores certificates listedunder insecure registries, and does not send client certificates. Commandslike docker run that attempt to pull from the registry produce errormessages on the command line, as well as on the registry.

Directory structures for certificates

If you have this directory structure, you do not need to manually add the CAcertificate to your Mac OS system login:

The following further illustrates and explains a configuration with customcertificates:

You can also have this directory structure, as long as the CA certificate isalso in your keychain.

To learn more about how to install a CA root certificate for the registry andhow to set the client TLS certificate for verification, seeVerify repository client with certificatesin the Docker Engine topics.

Install shell completion

Docker Desktop comes with scripts to enable completion for the docker and docker-compose commands. The completion scripts may befound inside Docker.app, in the Contents/Resources/etc/ directory and can beinstalled both in Bash and Zsh.

Bash

Bash has built-in support forcompletion To activate completion for Docker commands, these files need to becopied or symlinked to your bash_completion.d/ directory. For example, if youinstalled bash via Homebrew:

Add the following to your ~/.bash_profile:

OR

Docker Tutorial For Beginners Mac

Zsh

In Zsh, the completionsystemtakes care of things. To activate completion for Docker commands,these files need to be copied or symlinked to your Zsh site-functions/directory. For example, if you installed Zsh via Homebrew:

Docker tutorial mac os

Fish-Shell

Fish-shell also supports tab completion completionsystem. To activate completion for Docker commands,these files need to be copied or symlinked to your Fish-shell completions/directory.

Create the completions directory:

Now add fish completions from docker.

Docker Tutorial Macbook Pro

Give feedback and get help

To get help from the community, review current user topics, join or start adiscussion, log on to our Docker Desktop for Macforum.

To report bugs or problems, log on to Docker Desktop for Mac issues onGitHub,where you can review community reported issues, and file new ones. SeeLogs and Troubleshooting for more details.

For information about providing feedback on the documentation or update it yourself, see Contribute to documentation.

Docker Hub

Select Sign in /Create Docker ID from the Docker Desktop menu to access your Docker Hub account. Once logged in, you can access your Docker Hub repositories and organizations directly from the Docker Desktop menu.

For more information, refer to the following Docker Hub topics:

Two-factor authentication

Tutorial

Docker Desktop enables you to sign into Docker Hub using two-factor authentication. Two-factor authentication provides an extra layer of security when accessing your Docker Hub account.

You must enable two-factor authentication in Docker Hub before signing into your Docker Hub account through Docker Desktop. For instructions, see Enable two-factor authentication for Docker Hub.

After you have enabled two-factor authentication:

  1. Go to the Docker Desktop menu and then select Sign in / Create Docker ID.

  2. Enter your Docker ID and password and click Sign in.

  3. After you have successfully signed in, Docker Desktop prompts you to enter the authentication code. Enter the six-digit code from your phone and then click Verify.

After you have successfully authenticated, you can access your organizations and repositories directly from the Docker Desktop menu.

Where to go next

  • Try out the walkthrough at Get Started.

  • Dig in deeper with Docker Labs examplewalkthroughs and source code.

  • For a summary of Docker command line interface (CLI) commands, seeDocker CLI Reference Guide.

  • Check out the blog post, What’s New in Docker 17.06 Community Edition(CE).

mac, tutorial, run, docker, local, machine-->

Applies to: SQL Server (all supported versions) - Linux

Note

The examples shown below use the docker.exe but most of these commands also work with Podman. It provides the CLI similar to Docker container Engine. You can read more about podman here.

In this quickstart, you use Docker to pull and run the SQL Server 2017 container image, mssql-server-linux. Then connect with sqlcmd to create your first database and run queries.

Tip

If you want to run SQL Server 2019 containers, see the SQL Server 2019 version of this article.

Note

Starting with SQL Server 2019 CU3, Ubuntu 18.04 is supported.

In this quickstart, you use Docker to pull and run the SQL Server 2019 container image, mssql-server. Then connect with sqlcmd to create your first database and run queries.

Docker Mac Howto

Tip

This quickstart creates SQL Server 2019 containers. If you prefer to create SQL Server 2017 containers, see the SQL Server 2017 version of this article.

This image consists of SQL Server running on Linux based on Ubuntu 18.04. It can be used with the Docker Engine 1.8+ on Linux or on Docker for Mac/Windows. This quickstart specifically focuses on using the SQL Server on Linux image. The Windows image is not covered, but you can learn more about it on the mssql-server-windows-developer Docker Hub page.

Prerequisites

  • Docker Engine 1.8+ on any supported Linux distribution or Docker for Mac/Windows. For more information, see Install Docker.
  • Docker overlay2 storage driver. This is the default for most users. If you find that you are not using this storage provider and need to change, see the instructions and warnings in the docker documentation for configuring overlay2.
  • Minimum of 2 GB of disk space.
  • Minimum of 2 GB of RAM.
  • System requirements for SQL Server on Linux.

Pull and run the 2017 container image

Before starting the following steps, make sure that you have selected your preferred shell (bash, PowerShell, or cmd) at the top of this article.

  1. Pull the SQL Server 2017 Linux container image from Microsoft Container Registry.

    Tip

    If you want to run SQL Server 2019 containers, see the SQL Server 2019 version of this article.

    The previous command pulls the latest SQL Server 2017 container image. If you want to pull a specific image, you add a colon and the tag name (for example, mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2017-GA-ubuntu). To see all available images, see the mssql-server Docker hub page.

    For the bash commands in this article, sudo is used. On macOS, sudo might not be required. On Linux, if you do not want to use sudo to run Docker, you can configure a docker group and add users to that group. For more information, see Post-installation steps for Linux.

  2. To run the container image with Docker, you can use the following command from a bash shell (Linux/macOS) or elevated PowerShell command prompt.

    Note

    If you are using PowerShell Core, replace the double quotes with single quotes.

    Note

    The password should follow the SQL Server default password policy, otherwise the container can not setup SQL server and will stop working. By default, the password must be at least 8 characters long and contain characters from three of the following four sets: Uppercase letters, Lowercase letters, Base 10 digits, and Symbols. You can examine the error log by executing the docker logs command.

    By default, this creates a container with the Developer edition of SQL Server 2017. The process for running production editions in containers is slightly different. For more information, see Run production container images.

    The following table provides a description of the parameters in the previous docker run example:

    ParameterDescription
    -e 'ACCEPT_EULA=Y'Set the ACCEPT_EULA variable to any value to confirm your acceptance of the End-User Licensing Agreement. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -e 'SA_PASSWORD=<[email protected]>'Specify your own strong password that is at least 8 characters and meets the SQL Server password requirements. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -p 1433:1433Map a TCP port on the host environment (first value) with a TCP port in the container (second value). In this example, SQL Server is listening on TCP 1433 in the container and this is exposed to the port, 1433, on the host.
    --name sql1Specify a custom name for the container rather than a randomly generated one. If you run more than one container, you cannot reuse this same name.
    -h sql1Used to explicitly set the container hostname, if you don't specify it, it defaults to the container ID which is a randomly generated system GUID.
    -dRun the container in the background (daemon)
    mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2017-latestThe SQL Server 2017 Linux container image.
  3. To view your Docker containers, use the docker ps command.

    You should see output similar to the following screenshot:

  4. If the STATUS column shows a status of Up, then SQL Server is running in the container and listening on the port specified in the PORTS column. If the STATUS column for your SQL Server container shows Exited, see the Troubleshooting section of the configuration guide.

The -h (host name) parameter as discussed above, changes the internal name of the container to a custom value. This is the name you'll see returned in the following Transact-SQL query:

Setting -h and --name to the same value is a good way to easily identify the target container.

  1. As a final step, change your SA password because the SA_PASSWORD is visible in ps -eax output and stored in the environment variable of the same name. See steps below.

Pull and run the 2019 container image

Before starting the following steps, make sure that you have selected your preferred shell (bash, PowerShell, or cmd) at the top of this article.

  1. Pull the SQL Server 2019 Linux container image from Microsoft Container Registry.

    Note

    If you are using PowerShell Core, replace the double quotes with single quotes.

    Tip

    This quickstart uses the SQL Server 2019 Docker image. If you want to run the SQL Server 2017 image, see the SQL Server 2017 version of this article.

    The previous command pulls the SQL Server 2019 container image based on Ubuntu. To instead use container images based on RedHat, see Run RHEL-based container images. To see all available images, see the mssql-server-linux Docker hub page.

    For the bash commands in this article, sudo is used. On macOS, sudo might not be required. On Linux, if you do not want to use sudo to run Docker, you can configure a docker group and add users to that group. For more information, see Post-installation steps for Linux.

  2. To run the container image with Docker, you can use the following command from a bash shell (Linux/macOS) or elevated PowerShell command prompt.

    Note

    The password should follow the SQL Server default password policy, otherwise the container can not setup SQL server and will stop working. By default, the password must be at least 8 characters long and contain characters from three of the following four sets: Uppercase letters, Lowercase letters, Base 10 digits, and Symbols. You can examine the error log by executing the docker logs command.

    By default, this creates a container with the Developer edition of SQL Server 2019.

    The following table provides a description of the parameters in the previous docker run example:

    ParameterDescription
    -e 'ACCEPT_EULA=Y'Set the ACCEPT_EULA variable to any value to confirm your acceptance of the End-User Licensing Agreement. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -e 'SA_PASSWORD=<[email protected]>'Specify your own strong password that is at least 8 characters and meets the SQL Server password requirements. Required setting for the SQL Server image.
    -p 1433:1433Map a TCP port on the host environment (first value) with a TCP port in the container (second value). In this example, SQL Server is listening on TCP 1433 in the container and this is exposed to the port, 1433, on the host.
    --name sql1Specify a custom name for the container rather than a randomly generated one. If you run more than one container, you cannot reuse this same name.
    -h sql1Used to explicitly set the container hostname, if you don't specify it, it defaults to the container ID which is a randomly generated system GUID.
    mcr.microsoft.com/mssql/server:2019-latestThe SQL Server 2019 Ubuntu Linux container image.
  3. To view your Docker containers, use the docker ps command.

    You should see output similar to the following screenshot:

  4. If the STATUS column shows a status of Up, then SQL Server is running in the container and listening on the port specified in the PORTS column. If the STATUS column for your SQL Server container shows Exited, see Troubleshooting SQL Server Docker containers.

The -h (host name) parameter as discussed above, changes the internal name of the container to a custom value. This changes the internal name of the container to a custom value. This is the name you'll see returned in the following Transact-SQL query:

Setting -h and --name to the same value is a good way to easily identify the target container.

  1. As a final step, change your SA password because the SA_PASSWORD is visible in ps -eax output and stored in the environment variable of the same name. See steps below.

Change the SA password

The SA account is a system administrator on the SQL Server instance that gets created during setup. After creating your SQL Server container, the SA_PASSWORD environment variable you specified is discoverable by running echo $SA_PASSWORD in the container. For security purposes, change your SA password.

  1. Choose a strong password to use for the SA user.

  2. Use docker exec to run sqlcmd to change the password using Transact-SQL. In the following example, replace the old password, <YourStrong!Passw0rd>, and the new password, <YourNewStrong!Passw0rd>, with your own password values.

Connect to SQL Server

The following steps use the SQL Server command-line tool, sqlcmd, inside the container to connect to SQL Server.

Tutorial
  1. Use the docker exec -it command to start an interactive bash shell inside your running container. In the following example sql1 is name specified by the --name parameter when you created the container.

  2. Once inside the container, connect locally with sqlcmd. Sqlcmd is not in the path by default, so you have to specify the full path.

    Tip

    You can omit the password on the command-line to be prompted to enter it.

  3. If successful, you should get to a sqlcmd command prompt: 1>.

Create and query data

The following sections walk you through using sqlcmd and Transact-SQL to create a new database, add data, and run a query.

Create a new database

The following steps create a new database named TestDB.

  1. From the sqlcmd command prompt, paste the following Transact-SQL command to create a test database:

  2. On the next line, write a query to return the name of all of the databases on your server:

  3. The previous two commands were not executed immediately. Type GO on a new line to execute the previous commands:

Insert data

Next create a new table, Inventory, and insert two new rows.

  1. From the sqlcmd command prompt, switch context to the new TestDB database:

  2. Create new table named Inventory:

  3. Insert data into the new table:

  4. Type GO to execute the previous commands:

Select data

Now, run a query to return data from the Inventory table.

  1. From the sqlcmd command prompt, enter a query that returns rows from the Inventory table where the quantity is greater than 152:

  2. Execute the command:

Exit the sqlcmd command prompt

  1. To end your sqlcmd session, type QUIT:

  2. To exit the interactive command-prompt in your container, type exit. Your container continues to run after you exit the interactive bash shell.

Connect from outside the container

You can also connect to the SQL Server instance on your Docker machine from any external Linux, Windows, or macOS tool that supports SQL connections.

The following steps use sqlcmd outside of your container to connect to SQL Server running in the container. These steps assume that you already have the SQL Server command-line tools installed outside of your container. The same principles apply when using other tools, but the process of connecting is unique to each tool.

  1. Find the IP address for the machine that hosts your container. On Linux, use ifconfig or ip addr. On Windows, use ipconfig.

  2. For this example, install the sqlcmd tool on your client machine. For more information, see Install sqlcmd on Windows or Install sqlcmd on Linux.

  3. Run sqlcmd specifying the IP address and the port mapped to port 1433 in your container. In this example, that is the same port, 1433, on the host machine. If you specified a different mapped port on the host machine, you would use it here. You will also need to open the appropriate inbound port on your firewall to allow the connection.

  4. Run Transact-SQL commands. When finished, type QUIT.

Other common tools to connect to SQL Server include:

Tutorial

Remove your container

If you want to remove the SQL Server container used in this tutorial, run the following commands:

Warning

Stopping and removing a container permanently deletes any SQL Server data in the container. If you need to preserve your data, create and copy a backup file out of the container or use a container data persistence technique.

Docker demo

After you have tried using the SQL Server container image for Docker, you might want to know how Docker is used to improve development and testing. The following video shows how Docker can be used in a continuous integration and deployment scenario.

Next steps

For a tutorial on how to restore database backup files into a container, see Restore a SQL Server database in a Linux Docker container. Explore other scenarios, such as running multiple containers, data persistence, and troubleshooting.

Also, check out the mssql-docker GitHub repository for resources, feedback, and known issues.

Coments are closed
Scroll to top